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FREQUENTLY ASKED PERMANENT COSMETIC MAKEUP QUESTIONS

  • Is there discomfort involved? 
    The sensation can vary from person-to-person. A topical anesthetic is applied to significantly reduce discomfort.
  • Do I need to take time off from work? 
    Sometimes the procedure causes temporary swelling, redness and in rare cases, bruising. Most people do not need to take time from their employment and some people have their touchups done on their lunch hour while others prefer to take a day to recover.
  • How “permanent” is permanent? 
    Although this is a permanent procedure, color will fade over time and will require maintenence visits.
  • How is permanent cosmetic makeup applied? 
    With a hand-held implanter. The depth of the pigment deposit is regulated, making the procedure safe and controlled.
  • What if styles change?
    We don’t prefer to do anything trendy. For example, even if you wanted to wear a different color lip liner or lipstick, the color you apply would override your permanent color.
  • Do I have a choice as far as color or intensity is concerned? 
    The range of colors available to be implanted is almost endless and can be custom tailored to fit every individual’s need. Shape and positioning can be perfected. The color can heal to a soft natural look or it can be very dramatic. The color can also be placed in strokes or lines to emulate hair, such as with a permanent eyebrow procedure. The healed in color can be added to or softened on discretion.
Frequently Asked Permanent Cosmetic Makeup Questions
  • How much time is involved? 
    During your first visit, there will be a consultation and an allergy scratch test. If you elect to have a procedure, the time needed will vary depending on the procedure desired. A follow up visit may also be neccessary, depending on individual needs.
  • Is infection possible? 
    Anytime the skin is open, even from a tiny scratch, infection is possible. The treated area must be kept clean. There are usually no major complications.
  • Who uses permanent cosmetic makeup? 
    The original procedure was designed for people who have experienced hair loss due to Chemotherapy or Alopecia, have poor vision, limited or poor motor skills, vitiligo, in need of scar camouflage, arthritis or other physical challenges. For them, permanent cosmetics is not a “luxury,” but a means by which they can enhance their self-esteem.Areolas can be shaped and re-pigmented in breast cancer patients after a mastectomy. Scar camouflage can also be accomplished by the application of permanent cosmetics.

    Virtually every person who uses an eyebrow pencil or eyeliner is a candidate. No more eyebrow pencils or liner that smudges! People whose brows are sparse or non-existant can enjoy the benefits.

    Also, people whose brows are blonde or light in color can enjoy permanent brows in individualized shapes and custom blended colors that enhance their facial features. As for eyeliner or eyelash enhancement, a fine soft and natural line, small dots, a soft smudged look or a semi-dramatic look can be achieved to create depth and definition to the eyes.

    Permanent make-up is the perfect solution for reshaping uneven lips and for making the lips appear larger and fuller. It has the added benefit of preventing lipstick from bleeding. It covers scars and can give the lips a very natural look, or may be applied more heavily for a classic dramatic look.

  • Are there any side-effects? 
    Sometimes there is swelling of the treated area. This may last from two to seventy two hours. There may be some tenderness for a few days. The color may be darker than you would expect for the first 5-10 days.
  • Does the procedure pose allergy problems? 
    We perform a scratch test with the chosen pigment to be used to reduce the chance of an unexpected allergic reaction but keep in mind that you can develop an allergy to anything at anytime. Many doctors recommend that people who are alergic to cosmetics have these procedures done because they will replace cosmetic products that they are sensitive to.
  • Do doctors provide permanent make-up? 
    Some do, but since most could not devote the time necessary to become proficient with this service, most Plastic Surgeons, dermatologists and other medical doctors, refer patients to Board Certified Permanent Cosmetic Specialists.
  • Is it safe? 
    Procedures are done under strict hygienic conditions and standards in line with those set by the Centers for Disease Control. All supplies are used one time only (disposable).
  • How does your method differ from a doctor’s? 
    These procedures are ART and not science. Please be aware that while a doctor may provide a “general anesthetic” you, the client, have no control over the position of color. Some MD’s are trained in these procedures, but most prefer to stay within their field of expertise. Because I have practiced cosmetic artistry for many years, I have experience helping people with color, design, balance and compatibility.
  • What precautions must I take? 
    The only precautions involve the lips. If you have a history of fever blisters, cold sores, shingles, canker sores or mouth ulcers, you must get a prescription of anti-viral medication prescribed by a doctor prior to the procedure. This helps eliminate a virus from occuring.
  • Why is it so important that a Permanent Cosmetics Technician be Board Certified by The American Academy Of Micropigmentation?
    The D.A.A.M / F.A.A.M examination through the American Micropigmentation Academy is the only national, board certification available. It was developed to assure the client that the technician has demonstrated extensive knowledge, an expert ability to apply that knowledge as well as practical skill. It’s important that the technician you trust to do your permanent makeup have one of these certifications. The difference between the two Board Certifications are that the D.A.A.M means you took the American Academy of Micropigmentation’s test & passed, while the F.A.A.M means you took the test, passed & decided to also become of paid member.